Jumping Radio Show Episode 45 by Back on Track – Rising Star Jessica Springsteen

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One of the sport’s rising stars, Jessica Springsteen joins Chris and Brianne on this week’s episode to tell us what her riding plans are for the WEF and summer season. Plus we have another nutritionist tip from our regular contributor, Dr. Tania Cubitt. All that and some sound advice from Brianne too, so take a listen…

Jumping Radio Episode 45 – Show Notes and Links:

  • Show Host: Chris Stafford
  • Guest Co-host: Brianne Goutal
  • Photo Credit: Bruce Springsteen
  • Guest: Jessica Springsteen: A rising star in the sport who is breaking onto the Grand Prix Circuit at the Winter Equestrian Festival.
  • Guest: Dr Tania Cubitt, HRN Regular Contributor on Nutrition in horses – www.performancehorsenutrition.com

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Comments

  • Halle said:

    Hello,

    I am a big fan of the Jumping show, although my personal favorite is the Eventing Radio show (my chosen discipline) and have listened to all episodes. I think Chris does a beautiful job. My favorite part of the Jumping show has been listening to Dr. Tania Cubitt’s discuss nutrition. She has a wonderful way of explaining horse nutrition in an interesting, professional and (pardon the pun) digestible way. More of Dr. Tania Cubitt! She could have her own show. I have only listened to her on the last few shows. Has she “crossed disciplines” and made any appearances on any of the other shows that I can listen to?

    I do have one critique. I am currently 27 years old, I compete at the upper levels of eventing as an adult amateur and really struggle to be able to pay for my love/hobby/addiction (call it what you will) of 3-day eventing. Maybe I just have not had enough exposure to the jumper world to know better but I find it somewhat nauseating listening to these young girls discussing balancing their “college life” while trying to balance horse shopping and competing in Europe and Wellington. I feel like there is a piece of the pie missing and important questions are not being asked. Maybe the questions I want asked are too hard though. As a 27 year old struggling to make ends meet, I am curious to know more about how these young people pay for all of these expenses. Is it really just Mom and Dad footing the bill or is there something more than I am missing? Is sponsorship that much better in the jumper world that they will pay for some of this? How do these kids transition from the hunter world to the Grand Prix jumpers? Do they go out and find a particular kind of horse to help them make that transition? And if it is just Mom and Dad writing the checks (no judgment passed, my parents helped me for years), then I am curious about the following: What do their parents do for a living? (OK maybe you can’t ask this, but I want to know, regardless). Do they have a plan to transition from parental support to eventually pay for themselves? What does this transition look like? How do they feel about this? Is this accepted in the Jumper world? Maybe there is a rider I don’t know about (again, I’m an eventer), who has paved the way for themselves and didn’t have their parents financial support. How did their path differ from these other kids?

    This could be its own show and I’d love to hear the same questions posed to some people on the eventing radio show as well.

    One last thought. Chris often discusses “kids not spending enough time in the barns” and a lack of horsemanship in America today. What kind of responsibilities do these young riders take on around the barn or do they only ride? I’d like to know more about this.

    Thank you so much,

    Halle

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